CHASE-Logo Center for Hardware Assurance, Security and Engineering UCONN
CHASE Newsletter

director
A Message From CHASE Director:
The emergence of a globalized, horizontal business model, further scaling of the technology, and emergence of new technologies have raised urgent concerns about the security, reliability, availability, and trustworthiness of the hardware underlying the information systems on which modern society is reliant. CHASE’s mission is to establish a newly coordinated field of knowledge in Hardware Assurance and Security. This Center is vital to modern society's microelectronics-enabled life-critical, mission-critical and safety-critical systems. Transportation and utility infrastructures, financial and military systems and the information systems supporting food, water, energy, manufacturing, aerospace, and health care activities all cannot be built upon unreliable hardware. Such systems are vulnerable to following threats:

Counterfeit Electronics: Recycled, over-produced, cloned, defective, out-of-spec chips
Tampering: Insertion of malicious circuitry called Trojan to act as ‘kill switches’ or backdoor to leak information and probing the chips for extracting sensitive data
Security: Extraction of sensitive data from an IC and systems using hardware-based side channels, malicious system disruption and diversion using backdoors in hardware
Reliability: Failure in the field due to particle strikes, device aging, hot-spots, etc.
Quality: Electrical test and metrics for evaluating confidence and quality
Risk Management and Analysis: Risk and decision analysis considering cost/benefit/confidence
Emerging Threats: New threats, counterfeit trends, and attacks

The following research carried out in CHASE center aimed at developing unique solution to these threats.

Development of New Counterfeit Detection and Avoidance Techniques: This CRA focuses on the development of novel techniques for detection and avoidance of counterfeit ICs. The techniques are aimed at lowering the test cost, increasing test effectiveness, and securing supply chain for developing techniques to prevent counterfeiting.

Risk and Test Technology Assessment: The focus of this CRA is on development of techniques to effectively perform risk management, test technology assessment, and continuously monitoring counterfeiting trends, test techniques, and security attacks, and development of metrics to analyze the effectives of the techniques considering cost/benefit/confidence.

Development of Standard Tests and Measurements for IC Authentication: Development of acceptance and in-field test and measurement techniques for identification and authentication of ICs, embedded systems, and PCBs would be the focus of this CRA.

Hardware Security and Trust: This CRA will focus on the development of tools and methodologies for ensuring trustworthiness on integrated circuits and Systems targeting malicious inclusions, side-channel attacks, probing attacks, etc.

Transistor-to-System Reliability Analysis: This CRA addresses the much-needed reliability problem in modern systems.

Chip-to-System Level Test, Quality Analysis, Debug, and Diagnosis:The focus will be on development of tools and methodologies for testing integrated circuits and systems during manufacturing test, system bring up, and in the field.

CHASE has dedicated research and administrative space in the new “Information Technology Building” built as part of the 10-year, $1 billion State of Connecticut-funded capital improvement program.
The support staff, responsible for providing the services necessary to carry out the mission of CHASE, includes software and hardware specialists, and administrative support personnel funded through internal and external sources. The research staff is composed of faculty, visiting researchers, post-doctoral fellows, and graduate and undergraduate students.

CHASE faculty work very closely with industry and government and hope to further strengthen their relationship in the near future. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions or would like to know more about how to become a member of the center.

Best regards,

Mohammad (Mark) Tehranipoor, PhD
F.L. Castleman Associate Professor in Engineering Innovation
University of Connecticut, ECE Department
Email: tehrani@engr.uconn.edu
URL: http://www.engr.uconn.edu/~tehrani
Phone: 860-486-3471(Office)/5274(Lab)
CHASE Center: http://www.chase.uconn.edu/

New Publication

BISA: Built-In Self-Authentication for Preventing Hardware Trojan Insertion, IEEE Symposium on Hardware-Oriented Security and Trust (HOST), 2013.

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Abstract: Hardware Trojans have become a significant threat to government agencies and enterprises that require security and trustworthiness in systems with critical applications. Detecting hardware Trojans is very challenging because of the diversity of Trojans and unpredictable process variations during fabrication. In this paper, we propose a novel technique, called built-in self-authentication (BISA), that can fill unused spaces in a circuit layout by functional filler cells instead of non-functional filler cells. All functional filler cells will be tested by BISA itself and a digital signature would be generated. Any modification on BISA will result in a different signature. Thus, BISA can be used to prevent Trojan insertion or make Trojan insertion extremely difficult. BISA can be applied to any flat or bottom-up hierarchical design, and we evaluate it on different circuits to demonstrate the effective of this technique.

News

Conference on Counterfeit Electronics Addresses Growing National Concern

Counterfeit IC
A counterfeit integrated circuit and a cotton swab showing paint removed from the fraudulent label. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)
Some of the nation’s top experts in computer hardware security gathered in Storrs this week to discuss new ways to thwart a growing international counterfeit electronics industry. Reports are increasing of recycled and cloned computer chips making their way into the electronic component supply chain that threaten the integrity of everything from cell phones and personal computers to medical devices and the weapon systems of military fighter jets. In a series of workshops on Jan. 28 and 29, engineers from Intel, Texas Instruments, Analog Devices, Honeywell, the Missile Defense Agency (MDA), and Connecticut-based SMT Corp., as well as other entities, discussed new tools for improving detection in the increasingly advanced – and profitable – world of counterfeit electronics. They also discussed ways to stay one step ahead of the counterfeiters through the development of low-cost technologies that would stamp unique “signatures” on hardware components to ensure that only reliable, high-quality parts are available to manufacturers.Read more

Featured Item

Hardware Hacking Course

book
Abstract: Hardware Trojans have become a significant threat to government agencies and enterprises that require security and trustworthiness in systems with critical applications. Detecting hardware Trojans is very challenging because of the diversity of Trojans and unpredictable process variations during fabrication. In this paper, we propose a novel technique, called built-in self-authentication (BISA), that can fill unused spaces in a circuit layout by functional filler cells instead of non-functional filler cells. All functional filler cells will be tested by BISA itself and a digital signature would be generated. Any modification on BISA will result in a different signature. Thus, BISA can be used to prevent Trojan insertion or make Trojan insertion extremely difficult. BISA can be applied to any flat or bottom-up hierarchical design, and we evaluate it on different circuits to demonstrate the effective of this technique.

Membership

CHASE is a research consortium with member companies from across the nation committed to enabling knowledge breakthroughs that shape future electronic systems. The center provides membership opportunity at three different levels (Platinum, Gold, and Silver). Depending on the level of the membership, a different set of benefits will be made available to the members.

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